Duties of Lead, Vice and Skip

Wicking

On being THE LEAD in a Lawn Bowls Game:

Being a LEAD (the first position for a novice bowler) does not require knowledge of all facets of the Lawn Bowls Game. Just these few.

1. A LEAD will sign in and place his/her name chip in the LEAD area of the team assembly board.

2. Acquire his/her bowls and place outside awaiting team selection.

3. Have coffee and doughnuts.

4. When the teams are to be selected, go to board when leads are announced and select a chip. Place your name chip on roster board.

5. Pick up bowls, go to assigned rink and sign in for team A or B.

6. A coin will be flipped and a lead will be asked to chose heads or tails. Whichever lead wins will ask their skip do we go first or second.

7. If your team is first. Lay out mat in proper area. Deliver JACK to distance the Skip has selected (where he or she is standing). Center JACK by directing SKIP. If you deliver JACK too short or too long (in the ditch) the JACK will be returned and the your opponent's LEAD will deliver the JACK. The other Skip may direct your opponent to change the mat. If both JACKS are delivered incorrectly the Skip will place the Jack 6 feet from the ditch. You still bowl first even if your opponent delivered the Jack.

8. Select a bowl and deliver to the JACK. Generally a lead should try and deliver two bowls near the jack and one behind the (1- 3 feet if possible). It is better to be long than short.

9. Leads may get directions from the Skip to deliver bowls left or right. The Skip may indicate how far your bowl is from the Jack so stay on mat and look at your skip until the bowl stops. Exit the mat to your right. Remain 3 to 4 feet behind opponent when he/she is bowling and remain quiet.

10. After Leads & Vices have bowled, walk to head of green while Skips bowl. After all bowls have been delivered, Vices will determine score and signal Skips.

11. Losing teams LEAD will then rake the bowls one or two feet behind the mat, being laid by winning LEAD, two feet to right of mat, looking toward the Skips.

12. Start new end.



On being THE VICE in a Lawn Bowls Game:

1. As with the LEAD, remember your SKIP is in charge. You must try to follow the SKIPS instructions on the delivery direction and placement of your bowls.

2. Possession of the rink:  remember when your teammate's bowl has come to rest, you should immediately retire behind the head and make no observations of the head, or relate any changes that might have taken place. Remain quiet, your opponents now possess the rink.

3. After completing delivery and the exchange of ends, your function is to report (signal) when asked by the SKIP specific information regarding the position of the bowls in the head.

4. Know your SKIP...ask him in advance if he wants any special help.

5. Always use shoulder/thigh slaps rather than fingers for up or down.

6. If what you consider to be a dangerous situation has developed in the head, do not hesitate to motion your SKIP to come take a look.

7. All players at the head end are to stand at least 6 feet behind the jack, except the director in possession of the rink. All players at the head end of the rink shall remain motionless until the bowl has been delivered.

8. You will chalk-mark all touchers either before the next bowl is delivered or before the next bowl in course comes to rest. You will remove chalk from your opponents bowl when it is not a toucher. Remove any bowls from the Ditch which are non-touchers and guard the Front Ditch to prevent entry of a non-toucher bowl which may disturb the position of the Jack or one or more touchers in the ditch.

9. You must prevent any disturbance of the head by an outside object or by a dead bowl from another rink.

10. When an end is completed with all bowls delivered, it is the responsibility of both VICES to determine the score count of that particular end. Never signal the resulting score to your SKIP until all measurements needed have been made and you and your opponent have mutually agreed. When measuring for a multiple count, it can be helpful to place the bowls already measured on a wiping cloth to avoid confusion or possible re-count of a bowl previously measured.

11. The score should be kept by both teams. Tthe SKIP keeps the score. If no cards are kept in a local game, the director or the SKIP who is at the end where the scoreboard is should mark the score.

12. Both VICES will aid the LEAD raking the bowls at the conclusion of an end by kicking in bowls to more or less group them so as to make raking easier on both the LEAD and the green.

THE TEN COMMANDMENTS FOR VICES

I.        THOU SHALT NOT BE IGNORANT ABOUT WHICH BOWLS BELONG TO THY TEAM MEMBERS.
II.       THOU SHALT NOT BEGIN TO BOWL BEFORE THY SKIP HAS TOLD THEE WHAT HE OR SHE WANTS
           THEE TO ATTEMPT.
III.     THOU SHALT NOT MEASURE IMPROPERLY.
IV.      THOU SHALT NOT WANDER OFF DURING PLAY SO THAT THOU KNOWEST NOT THE SITUATION WHEN
           IT IS THY TURN TO BOWL.
V.       THOU SHALT NOT FORGET TO COMMUNICATE WTH THY SKIP WHEN THE HEAD HAS BEEN CHANGED.
VI.      THOU SHALT NOT BE MOVING OR IN THE HEAD WHEN THY TEAM HATH NOT POSSESSION OF THE MAT AND RINK.
VII.    THOU SHALT NOT SIGNAL TO THY SKIP THE NUMBER OF POINTS BEFORE CONSULTING WITH
           THE OPPOSING VICE.
VIII.   THOU SHALT NOT KICK BOWLS THAT HAVE BEEN COUNTED AS POINTS RATHER THAN PUT THEM ON A TOWEL.
IX.      THOU SHALT NOT TELL THY SKIP HOW OR WHAT TO PLAY NOR GIVE HIM OR HER INFORMATION
            THAT HE OR SHE HAS NOT REQUESTED.
X.        THOU SHALT NOT ATTEMPT TO MEASURE NOR CHANGE THE COUNT OF POINTS AFTER A TOTAL
            HAS BEEN AGREED UPON BY B0TH VICES.
 
SOME DoS AND DON'TS FOR PLAYING THE POSITION OF VICE
  
                                        DoS
  
        1.   Become familiar with the bowls of the people on your team even before the first bowl
        is delivered.
  
        2.   Inform your skip if a change takes place in the count of the head, but only when you
        have control of the mat and the rink.
  
        3.   Call your skip to the head when you are in control of the rink if there is a special
        circumstance that he should be aware of.
  
        4.   If your opponent is measuring for a point, watch carefully to see that it is being done
        correctly with the proper angle, no sagging of the tape, without moving the jack or the
        bowl, etc.
  
        5.   Get the permission of your opponent before you move any bowl that you are claiming
        as a point. When you do remove a point bowl, place it on a towel to make the final count
        more accurate.
  
        6.   If you are claiming a point but your opponent does not agree, don’t argue, just have
        him/her measure immediately.
  
        7.   Before you signal your skip on the point count, be sure your opponent has agreed to
        the same number.
  
        8.   If your team has won the end, pick up the jack and give it to your lead before the bowls
        are raked.
  
        9.   After each end, help kick the bowls into line to make it easier for the lead to rake.
  
        10.  If your team has lost the end, record the score after helping kick the bowls into line.
  
                                       DON’TS
  
        1.   Do not move when any player is on the mat and is ready to bowl.
  
        2.   When the opposing team has control of the mat and rink and one of the opposing team
        members is on the mat, do not approach the head or try to communicate with your skip.
  
        3.   Do not tell your skip what to do. If your skip wants advice or information, he/she
        should ask for it.
  
        4.   Do not volunteer to your opposing vice how many points his/her team has. He/she
       should state the number of points he/she thinks his/her team has, then you either agree or
       disagree with his/her claim.
  
        5.   Do not move any bowl or the jack until you are sure the last bowl has been delivered
       and the final count of points has been agreed upon. A good way to tell that all bowls have
       been delivered is to watch for the skips picking up the mat at the other end of the rink.
  
        6.   Do not socialize or wander off while the game is being played. A good team player
      stays focused on the play of everyone on his or her rink.
  


On being THE SKIP in a Lawn Bowls Game:

1.  The Skip keeps the score on the score card.

2. You are in charge of your team as director. You must decide, with your opponent, any dispute or refer it to the umpire. Sign both score sheets at the end of a match, and act as scorer in a pairs match.

3. It is part of your job to instruct your LEAD and VICE as to how you want them to play their shots with the best chance of producing a score for your team. Should one of your teammates fail to make the shot called for, don't be critical. Remember, the player knows without being told that it was a bad shot.

4. Stand still, don't move around the head. This can be quite distracting to other players.

5. When your opponent delivers the last bowl at the conclusion of an end, it is your responsibility to remove the mat.

6. It is important to remember that as the director of your team, your attitude towards your teammates and the game will often make the difference between a loss or win. The purpose of the game is to enjoy yourself, make it enjoyable for others and win if you can. But, when your team is down and the breaks seem to be all going against you, even the most naive should recognize that encouragement of your team may accomplish what caustic criticism or languishing on the bench when the LEAD or VICE is on the mat can never, never accomplish. You may not win the game, but your popularity will increase immeasurably.


Characteristics of a good skip
  
    1.  He/she must be good at making all types of shots.
    2.  he/she should practice the draw, trail, yard on, block and drive.
    3.  He/she must know the rules of the game.
    4.  He/she must be responsible for which tactics are used in the game.
    5.  He/she must be able to evaluate the speed of the green, weakness
        and strength of the opponent, and strength of his/her team.
    6.  He/she should know how to build a head on his/her own terms
        and force the opponent to make difficult shots.
    7.  He/she must set the tenor for good Sportsmanship; that is,
        be a real gentleman or lady.
    8.  He/she should know when to change the shape of the game by
        moving the mat and forcing opponents to play the weak hand.
    9.  He/she should know how to communicate clearly with confidence
        and assurance.
   10. He/she should know how to play the safe shots and avoid
        giving up a big score.
  
  
TIPS FOR SKIPS
  
    1.  Allow leads to draw twice before bowling for position.
    2.  Leads should not be asked to drive.
    3.  Skips should decide which hand plays best and stick with it
        if possible.
    4.  Build each head safely. If you must lose an end, it should be by
        a low score.
    5.  When you have the shot, bowl for position. When you're down
        a shot, draw.
    6.  Do not call for position bowls that will give your opponents
        a chance to wick in or rest on.
    7.  Try to cover all positions that jack would take if wicked.
    8.  Know when your team is in a position to make a big score.
    9.  The  drive is both an offensive and defensive weapon. Use it to
        nullify an end, move the jack, or push a bowl up.
    10. Blocks are very difficult to make. Practice block shots
        with opposite hand.